Fern – Macro Fine Art Photography

posted in: Fine Art | 52

Every now and again I like to challenge myself to create fine art photography pieces from the everyday, the ordinary. We have a fern in our kitchen that could use a little TLC now and then. In the hustle and bustle of everyday happenings, it doesn’t always get watered ;). Despite the lack of consistent nurture and care, it still survives (for now, at least).

Sometimes the detail is in the little things.

If you have any plants in your home, have you ever looked up close at them? Take this fern, for example. The patterns and repetition, the symmetry and color. Nature is full of art waiting to be discovered, things waiting to be photographed. It just takes the right eye to appreciate what’s already there …and to create a fine art interpretation to be enjoyed by others.

Fern - Plant Macro Fine Art Photography

I love looking at things like this fern from different angles. It always amazes me how a slight change in perspective can make a subject change so drastically. The gentle leaves become spiky points, the shadows deepen and darken, turning murky black. light and shadow are constantly at play with one another. Leading lines draw me into yet another fine art image, waiting to be captured on “film.”

Fern - Plant Macro Fine Art Photography

And then the fern becomes familiar, symmetric, again. With the soft light, the sharpness is gone.

Fern - Plant Macro Fine Art Photography

What is Fine Art Photography?

“But Betsy,” you ask, “what is fine art photography?” Well, that will vary depending on who you ask. Maybe fine art photography means landscape photographs or plant photographs to one person, but to another, that doesn’t qualify. Fine Art is really a tricky thing to define, because it is subjective by nature. Here’s how Wikipedia (I know, not the ultimate authority by any means) defines fine art photography:

Fine art photography is photography created in accordance with the vision of the artist as photographer. (Wikipedia: Fine Art Photography)

Basically, fine art photography is everything that is NOT commercial, photojournalistic, or documentary in nature. Fine art photography is not intended to be an objective representation, but a subjective representation, of reality.

Macro Fine Art Photography Tips

Look for the detail in the ordinary, the normal. Look for repetition, for design elements that are intriguing. Look for patterns in light and dark. It’s all about abstracting something known, something ordinary, into the extraordinary.

So far as cameras go, most point and shoots these days have macro photography or fine art photography settings of some sort. While your results may vary, I challenge you to give macro fine art photography a try next time you pick up your camera. Consider it an exercise in creativity. You’ll find yourself looking for fine art photography moments in the ordinary, the mundane.

Yes, it’s challenging, both from a technical standpoint and from a creative standpoint. But by simply experimenting with the creativity aspect, I bet you’ll be able to find more wonder in your everyday life. More fine art than you expect. It’s there, in your home, outside your front door, waiting to be appreciated and enjoyed.

52 Responses

  1. Leovi
    | Reply

    I love, beautiful pictures, exquisite texture in green!

  2. Randi, Sweden
    | Reply

    Beautiful captures of the fern!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you. It’s been sitting in my kitchen asking to be photographed for quite some time. Glad I finally did so 🙂

  3. a spirit of simplicity
    | Reply

    very pretty images. Great information as well. I am new to macro photography and interested in learning more about it.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thanks! Glad you found some useful info about macro fine art photography in my post. There is always more to learn, no matter how much you know about a subject, right? 🙂 Enjoy!

  4. Birgitta
    | Reply

    Beautiful macro shots!

  5. Quarter Life Cents
    | Reply

    I love your pictures. You are so talented and creative!

  6. noel
    | Reply

    I love to also do macro studies of nature, it’s fun to really be close up and capture amazing details that you normally would ignore, but close up it creates a dynamic observation and look into nature, thanks for sharing Betsy

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Yes, it seems the closer you look the more you learn about nature! Watching my toddler son examine the world around me is a constant reminder that we need to get down, close to the ground, and really examine things to fully appreciate their beauty.

  7. Laura Hegfield
    | Reply

    These are lovely fern macros, well done.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! I likewise enjoyed your macro photographs of the rusted metalwork.

  8. Sarah C.
    | Reply

    Yes, I love the same thing about nature and plants. The repetition is beautiful and I loved reading your post. I always felt sort of stupid because I didn’t really know what fine art photography is! Thanks for linking up!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thanks for visiting (and hosting)! It’s always fun to see other’s images.

  9. Laura Hegfield
    | Reply

    Thanks so much for sharing the love up-close with I Heart Macro, I hope you’ll join in again from time to time. The link is open every Saturday evening through Wednesday evening 🙂

  10. I love you works, Betsy. Very inspiring.
    I like how you find beautify in ordinariness.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! Your blog was a pleasure to peruse, by the way 🙂

  11. budget jan
    | Reply

    I have noticed how the light can change the appearance of an item. Especially in food and ceramic photography. Your fern photographs show that to perfection.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Lighting is everything, isn’t it?

      In the right light, at the right time, everything is extraordinary. -Aaron Rose
  12. Susie Clevenger
    | Reply

    I love taking a close look at things…art surrounds you if you just look. Beautiful photos…love the color and detail

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thanks! Art *is* everywhere, isn’t it.

  13. Gemma Wiseman
    | Reply

    Exquisite perspectives. Like an intimate look at the fern.

  14. Minoru
    | Reply

    Hi! I have never seen this plant so minutely.Looking at your photos, I found the beauty of this fern. Thanks for sharing.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      It always makes me happy to help someone else see the beauty in the details of life. Thank you for stopping by!

  15. Hootin' Anni
    | Reply

    Wonderful lighting in these macros. And an incredible green!!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! I don’t know about you, but here, we’re still waiting on spring to arrive… so any green is *especially* appreciated around here. I’m so glad I have houseplants!

  16. pat
    | Reply

    yep – the beauty is in the details!

  17. NatureFootstep Photo
    | Reply

    very beautiful fern macros. 🙂

  18. Amy @ Ms. Toody Goo Shoes
    | Reply

    Your fern photos are spectacular! I have played around with my macro setting, but you’ve inspired me to try some more!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! Enjoy experimenting 🙂 🙂 …that’s half the fun, right?

  19. Uwe
    | Reply

    Thanks a lot, Betsy, for your kind comment under my latest ‘almond blossom season’ post. Taking a view on your blog, I can see that photography is not only a job for you, it’s definitely your passion.
    Regards from Germany, Uwe.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      That is a very true observation, I’m so glad my love for photography comes through in my images. Thank you for the kind words!

  20. Gattina
    | Reply

    Looks very beautiful as a macro !

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thanks, I agree…now am wondering why I didn’t think to examine its beauty in detail sooner. 🙂

  21. These are beautiful! I have a fern in my house but I’ve never looked at them from this perspective. Thanks for the ideas!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! Always happy to inspire creativity 🙂 and share ideas.

  22. Mammasaurus
    | Reply

    Oh so true – there’s such beauty everywhere, people just need to slow down and take a closer look. Beautiful x

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Stop and smell the roses, right? 🙂 Thanks for stopping by. I enjoyed perusing your site earlier 🙂

  23. Honey
    | Reply

    Wow! Beautiful photos! x

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you! (by the way, love your blog name, very cute.)

  24. Hellie's Corner
    | Reply

    I love the detail of you have captured in your photos.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thanks Hellie! I like your sunrise post, very nice 🙂

  25. Thea
    | Reply

    Hi Betsy, Stopping by from Mom’s Small Victories link party and I am so glad I did. It is so nice to read photography tips from an expert and I thank you for sharing them. I love your points about looking for the detail, repetition and the patterns. You have given me some things to think about when I put a camera in action!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      You’re welcome, Thea! Glad to have given you some thoughts for next time you get creative with your camera 🙂

  26. Deborah
    | Reply

    What stunning pictures of a simple plant! I love nature photography. Thank you for sharing at What We Accomplished Wednesdays. Have a lovely week! ~Deborah

  27. Mary
    | Reply

    Wonderful photos! Love the texture and details!

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Thank you Mary 🙂 …and thanks for stopping by!

  28. Marianna Paulson
    | Reply

    The camera is a great tool to help you get in the habit of changing your perspective. A change in perspective is a great habit to get into to transform your stress.

    Close-ups of ferns remind me of Hawaii. That’s a good thing! 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

    • Betsy Finn
      | Reply

      Glad to remind you of Hawaii, Marianna! And that’s a nice relation of perspective being related to stress reduction. Thanks for sharing!

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